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WHATEVER HAPPENED TO HERESY?

16 Jun

Three of these four articles, friends, have already been published in the Emmaus Journal.  The fourth is due to be published soon.

In these articles I deal with figures like Origen, Carlton Pearson, Brian McLaren, Rob Bell, and others who have deviated from the Christian faith.

Please click on the links below to read these articles.

The first article is entitled:  “Whatever Happened to Heresy” and may be found here:

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO HERESY_ ARTICLE #1 CIU pdf.

The second article is entitled: “Whatever Happened to Heresy?” “Heroes or Heretics? — Two Classic Examples” and may be found here:

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO HERESY_ ARTICLE #2 CIU pdf

The third article is entitled:  “A Biblical Approach in Dealing with Heretics” and is found here:

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO HERESY_ ARTICLE #3 pdf

The fourth article is entitled:  “Help!  One of My Friends and Some of His Friends Seem to Be, How Shall I Say It?, Uh, Heretics!” and is found here:

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO HERESY_ ARTICLE #4 – word pdf

Comments are always welcome!

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3 Comments

Posted by on June 16, 2012 in doctrine, heresy

 

Tags: ,

3 responses to “WHATEVER HAPPENED TO HERESY?

  1. Nathan

    June 18, 2012 at 4:33 pm

    Larry, here’s two points/questions that perhaps you could address:

    1) I’ve often heard the apostles creed used as a “core” definition of what would fall inside and outside of “heresy”. Do you think that it goes beyond that? If so, what historical basis do you use? It seems to me that this creed, with >1500 years of history, sets a good “yardstick” for the essentials of Christian belief. I personally don’t think that we should be “defining” heresy in the 21st century. Rather, we should look to some sort of historical creed that has been affirmed by Christians for centuries across many cultures.

    2) It’s interesting that you quote from “Mere Christianity” in your article because I’m very interested in your opinion of CS Lewis. He has some highly “unorthodox” views (using that term loosely) including possible salvation of animals (in “Problem of Pain”) and that souls can leave Hell (“The Great Divorce”). He says “We do know that no [one] can be saved except through Christ; we do not know that only those who know Him can be saved through Him.” This is pretty clearly illustrated in his Narnia series at a couple points.
    It seems to me that if you view Rob Bell as guilty of heresy, then you would also have to lump C.S. Lewis into the same category.

     
  2. larrydixon

    June 21, 2012 at 10:27 am

    Nathan: Always good to hear from you. I had lunch yesterday with your brother-in-law Chris Lampman. To your first question, I argue that creeds are helpful, but don’t always cover the essentials. For example, the Apostles’ Creed says nothing about the nature of God’s revelation in the Scriptures — and it includes (at least later versions) a statement about Jesus’ descending to hell (which I deny). I would opt for Scripture’s authority in determining orthodox theology rather than historical tradition. Regarding your 2nd question, I’m still a fan of Lewis and would argue that he did not hold to opportunities to leave hell (“The Great Divorce” is fiction, as you know) and did not advocate salvation outside of Christ, I don’t believe. I see a radical difference between Bell and Lewis on the issue of eternal lostness. Your thoughts? Larry

     
  3. snoopy

    October 17, 2012 at 7:14 pm

    Seems like CS Lewis is just a more agnostic version of Rob Bell.

     

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