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Time for a great quote (C.S. Lewis on Jesus)

08 Nov

“I am trying here to prevent anyone saying the really foolish thing tScreen Shot 2014-11-05 at 5.00.48 AMhat people often say about Him: ‘I’m ready to accept Jesus as a great moral teacher, but I don’t accept his claim to be God.’ That is the one thing we must not say. A man who is merely a man and said the sort of things Jesus said would not be a great moral teacher. He would either be a lunatic – on a level with the man who says he is a poached egg – or else he would be the Devil of Hell. You must make your choice. Either this man was, and is, the Son of God: or else a madman or something worse. You can shut Him up for a fool, you can spit at Him and kill Him as a demon; or you can fall at His feet and call Him Lord and God. But let us not come with any patronising nonsense about His being a great human teacher. He has not left that open to us. He did not intend to.”  (Mere Christianity, 52-53)

 
1 Comment

Posted by on November 8, 2014 in Jesus Christ

 

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One response to “Time for a great quote (C.S. Lewis on Jesus)

  1. john

    November 8, 2014 at 6:31 am

    Larry:
    Quotes are just what they are: The opinions expressed by famous people. You still have to use your own mind to judge how relevant and truthful their meaning is.
    To stimulate your thinking I will quote another famous thinker.

    The everyday Christian. — If the Christian dogmas of a revengeful God, universal sinfulness, election by divine grace and the danger of eternal damnation were true, it would be a sign of weak-mindedness and lack of character not to become a priest, apostle or hermit and, in fear and trembling, to work solely on one’s own salvation; it would be senseless to lose sight of ones eternal advantage for the sake of temporal comfort. If we may assume that these things are at any rate believed true, then the everyday Christian cuts a miserable figure; he is a man who really cannot count to three, and who precisely on account of his spiritual imbecility does not deserve to be punished so harshly as Christianity promises to punish him.

    from Nietzsche’s Human, all too Human, s.116, R.J. Hollingdale transl.

    What a crude intellect is good for.– The Christian church is an encyclopaedia of prehistoric cults and conceptions of the most diverse origin, and that is why it is so capable of proselytizing: it always could, and it can still go wherever it pleases and it always found, and always finds something similar to itself to which it can adapt itself and gradually impose upon it a Christian meaning. It is not what is Christian in it, but the universal heathen character of its usages, which has favored the spread of this world-religion; its ideas, rooted in both the Jewish and the Hellenic worlds, have from the first known how to raise themselves above national and racial niceties and exclusiveness as though these were merely prejudices. One may admire this power of causing the most various elements to coalesce, but one must not forget the contemptible quality that adheres to this power: the astonishing crudeness and self-satisfiedness of the church’s intellect during the time it was in process of formation, which permitted it to accept any food and to digest opposites like pebbles.

    from Nietzsche’s Daybreak,s. 70, R.J. Hollingdale transl.

    Enjoy,
    John

     

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