RSS

Tag Archives: hatred

Bless-ed! 52 Blessings You Have As a Believer! (Blessing #15)

 BLESSING #15: The Blessing of a Godly Hatred
“I will tell you what to hate. Hate hypocrisy, hate can’t, hate indolence, oppression, injustice; hate Pharisaism; hate them as Christ hated them — with a deep, living, Godlike hatred.” (Frederick William Robertson)

We believers in Jesus are so blessed! Do we realize all the benefits of being saved, being made right with the Lord? My unsaved friend Mike doesn’t. Yet. So I’m counting some of my blessings as I think about what Mike doesn’t have as an unbeliever.

One of the most surprising truths about biblical Christianity is the fact that there is both godly and ungodly jealously, godly and ungodly pride, and godly and ungodly hatred. Really!

Our culture so emphasizes love that it doesn’t realize there is a place for biblical hatred! For believers it might be said that —
15. WE POSSESS A GODLY HATRED!



THE BLESSING We should hate hypocrisy, despise pedophilia, abhor child abuse, absolutely renounce racism, right? There is both godly and ungodly hatred. The actor Will Smith once said, “Throughout life people will make you mad, disrespect you and treat you bad. Let God deal with the things they do, cause hate in your heart will consume you too.” The challenge is to turn away from ungodly hatred and to embrace a godly revulsion toward those things He hates.

THE BIBLE It is quite surprising to see what the Bible has to say about God hating and also how believers are to hate. Here are some representative verses of God hating:
1. “The arrogant cannot stand in your presence. You hate all who do wrong.” (Ps. 5:5).
2. “The Lord examines the righteous, but the wicked, those who love violence, he hates with a passion.” (Ps. 11:5).
3. “There are six things the Lord hates, seven that are detestable to him . . .” (Prov. 6:16).
4. “Your New Moon feasts and your appointed festivals I hate with all my being.” (Is. 1:14).
5. “Because of all their wickedness in Gilgal, I hated them there.” (Hos. 9:15).
6. “I hate, I despise your religious festivals; your assemblies are a stench to me.” (Amos 5:21).
7. “‘Do not plot evil against each other, and do not love to swear falsely. I hate all this, declares the Lord.” (Zech. 8:17).
8. “. . . I have loved Jacob, but Esau I have hated” (Mal. 1:2-3).

One might make the point that a few of these texts sound like hyperbole, but not all of them. What verses do we have that say the child of God is to hate?
1. We read that there is “a time to love and a time to hate” (Ecc. 3:8).
2. The Psalmist says, “I hate those who cling to worthless idols; as for me, I trust in the Lord.” (Ps. 31:6).
3. Psalm 97 commands, “Let those who love the Lord hate evil” (v. 10).
4. The Psalmist asks a critical question in Psalm 139, “Do I not hate those who hate you, Lord, and abhor those who are in rebellion against you?” (v. 21).
5. Amos 5:15 issues the challenge: “Hate evil, love good; maintain justice in the courts.”
6. Jesus speaks about hatred in both Luke 14:26 and John 12:25 where we read, “If anyone comes to me and does not hate father and mother, wife and children, brothers and sisters — yes, even their own life — such a person cannot be my disciple.” John 12:25 says, “Anyone who loves their life will lose it, while anyone who hates their life in this world will keep it for eternal life.”
7. The Apostle Paul uses strong language as he thinks about his behavior as a believer: “I do not understand what I do. For what I want to do I do not do, but what I hate I do.” (Romans 7:15).
8. Paul seems to be referring back to the Amos passage when he says in Romans 12, “Love must be sincere. Hate what is evil; cling to what is good.” (v. 9).
9. The Apostle John quotes the Lord in Revelation 2 saying of the Ephesian church, “You have this in your favor: You hate the practices of the Nicolaitans, which I also hate.” (v. 6).
We might not like what the Bible says in those verses, but there it is. There are several levels of our hatred as we reject evil in our world — and in ourselves. Believers must define and defend biblical hatred even as they love those for whom Christ died.

ACTION STEPS 1. Imagine that your unsaved friend says to you, “I hear that Christians are to hate? That can’t be right!” How would you answer your friend using some of the verses above?
2. Think about Proverbs 6:16 (“There are six things the Lord hates . . .”) and list one practical way every day this week how you can show your hatred of the things God hates.
3. Read Tim Challies’ article on God’s hatred (found at: https://www.challies.com/articles/hate-what-god-hates/) and answer the question, “Why does God hate idolatry so much?”
PRAYER 4. So, how do I pray for my unsaved friend? I show by my godly life that I am grieved and angered at the effects of evil in our world and seek to do whatever I can to be salt and light in my culture. And I pray for my lost friend that he would experience a proper self-hatred that drives him to the Savior.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on May 19, 2022 in blessings

 

Tags: , , , ,

Bless-ed! 52 Blessings Your Lost Friend Doesn’t Have . . . And What You Can Do About It! (Part 14)

We believers in Jesus are so blessed! Do we realize all the benefits of being saved, made right with the Lord? My unsaved friend Mike doesn’t. Yet. So I’m counting some of my blessings as I think about what Mike doesn’t have as an unbeliever.

One of the most surprising truths about biblical Christianity is the fact that there is both godly and ungodly jealously, godly and ungodly pride, and godly and ungodly hatred. Really!

Our culture so emphasizes love that it doesn’t realize there is a place for biblical hatred! So, my unsaved friends, it could be said,

14. THEY DON’T POSSESS A GODLY HATRED!

The godly person is one “who despises a vile person
, but honors those who fear the Lord.” (Ps. 15:4). We should hate hypocrisy, despise pedophilia, abhor child abuse, absolutely renounce racism, right?

It is quite surprising to see what the Bible has to say about God hating and also how believers are to hate. Here are some representative verses:

We might not like what the Bible says in those verses, but there it is. There are several levels of our hatred as we reject evil in our world — and in ourselves. Believers must define and defend biblical hatred even as they love those for whom Christ died.

So, how do I pray for my unsaved friend? I show by my godly life that I am grieved and angered at the effects of evil in our world and seek to do whatever I can to be salt and light in my culture. And I pray for my lost friend that he would experience a proper self-hatred that drives him to the Savior. (to be continued)

 

 

 
 

Tags: , , , ,

Image

The Theology of Calvin . . . and Hobbes (Hatred)

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 25, 2022 in Calvin & Hobbes

 

Tags:

Saved! Rescued from God, by God, and for God! (Epilogue: Loathed)

Friends: This is the epilogue of a short book I wrote a couple of years ago. Comments welcome!

Epilogue: Loathed

“We are not simply dealing with matters of life and death. We are dealing with matters of eternal life and eternal death.” (Bill Hybels)

“I’m afraid that in the United States of America today the prevailing doctrine of justification is not justification by faith alone. It is not even justification by good works or by a combination of faith and works. The prevailing notion of justification in our culture today is justification by death. All one has to do to be received into the everlasting arms of God is to die.” (R.C. Sproul, Saved from What?)

If we have truly been rescued from God, by God, and for God, then there is no greater joy in life than in serving Him. Whatever that means.

Being rescued from God reminds us of the rightful, eternal judgment that awaited us upon death if our sins were not taken care of. John 3:36 says that “Whoever believes in the Son has eternal life, but whoever rejects the Son will not see life, for God’s wrath remains on them.” The Bible teaches that we come into this world as sinners, as those who are under the wrath of God. And the only way to get that wrath removed from us is to believe in His Son. Those who reject the Son won’t get eternal life, but eternal judgment. They will not see life. Why not? Because “God’s wrath remains on them.”

Some today bristle at the idea of God’s wrath. They not only hate Jonathan Edwards’ sermon “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God,” their perspective twists that sermon into “GOD in the Hands of Angry SINNERS!” Being rescued from God means being rescued from His wrath.

But we have also seen that our rescue from God was accomplished by God. Jesus Christ, the Second Person of the Divine Trinity, paid our debt that we might be

86

righteously forgiven. Only one who is fully divine could pay that debt. The centrality of the deity of the Lord Jesus is a doctrine rejected by many in our culture. What they do not realize is that a non- divine Jesus can’t save anyone.

The story is told of a liberal minister who was being tried for heresy by his denomination. “We understand that you deny the deity of Jesus,” the council said to him. “Is this true?” The minister replied, “Deny the deity of Jesus? Deny the deity of Jesus?!”, he replied. “I haven’t denied the deity of any of us!”

The central theme of the Bible is that God loved man so much that the Son of God volunteered to become human (without giving up His deity) for the express purpose of coming to this earth to die for man’s wrong-doings. To deny the deity of Jesus completely obliterates the meaning of His atoning work on the cross.

We have been rescued from God, by God, and for God. The burden of this book has not been to simply talk about how nice it is to be saved. Instead, we have looked at several implications of salvation. We have seen that our lostness has been taken care of. The work of salvation was done out of the love of God paying the debt we could never pay. We were lured into becoming fellow men-catchers with Jesus. We also saw that we have embarked on a life of learning in which Jesus Himself is our curriculum and He puts us to work. Because He is now our life, we are not devastated when we are labeled, but do our utmost to speak to the intellectuals of our day the Good News about Jesus, even if we are thought to be mental airheads in the process! There is now a glorious liberty to those who are the Sons and Daughters of God, and nothing should entice us to give up our

87

freedom in Jesus. With all these blessings, we also discovered that we have been launched into a mission for the Son of God and need to get to it.

But not all will believe. Not all will be saved. In fact, some will resist this message and will go to their graves passively ignoring or actively opposing Jesus and His atoning work. What about them?

Yes, what about those who die without Jesus? Those who refuse to see their own lostness, mock the love of God, steadfastly resist His attempt to lure them into the family of God — what about them? What about those who insist on not enrolling in Jesus University, who are content with the myths of this world and will not become learners of God’s grace? What about those who give no reason to be labeled as “little Christs,” and turn away from the liberty that God promises to His redeemed children? What about those who couldn’t care less about His mission and launch themselves into their own orbits of self- absorption? What about them?

Limits to God’s Love?

Some would say that the unredeemed, those who refuse to be saved, will still be loved eternally by God, even as they are separated from Him and the family of God. After all, isn’t the love of God everlasting? There can’t be limits to God’s love, can there?

But what does the Bible itself say about those who die without Jesus? We read in Matthew 25: “Then he will say to those on his left, ‘Depart from me, you who are cursed, into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels.’” (v. 41). To be in the category of the “cursed” does not sound like they are objects of God’s love. Earlier in this chapter of Matthew we read of a worthless servant. The master tells the

88

faithful servants to “. . . throw that worthless servant outside, into the darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.” (v. 30). At the end of Matthew 25 Jesus gives us a summary conclusion of the sheep and goats’ analogy: “Then they [the goats] will go away to eternal punishment, but the righteous [the sheep] to eternal life.” (v. 46)

The fate of those who die outside of Christ is explained as their being thrown out of His presence, a place of eternal fire originally prepared for the devil and his angels, a destiny described as eternal punishment where there will be everlasting weeping and gnashing of teeth.

The book of Revelation tells us that “A third angel followed them and said in a loud voice: ‘If anyone worships the beast and its image and receives its mark on their forehead or on their hand, 10 they, too, will drink the wine of God’s fury, which has been poured full strength into the cup of his wrath. They will be tormented with burning sulfur in the presence of the holy angels and of the Lamb. 11 And the smoke of their torment will rise for ever and ever. There will be no rest day or night for those who worship the beast and its image, or for anyone who receives the mark of its name.’” (ch. 14).

We read in Revelation 16 of those who experience a foretaste of God’s wrath: “They were seared by the intense heat and they cursed the name of God, who had control over these plagues, but they refused to repent and glorify him.” (v. 9). This seems to contradict those who say that a moment’s experience of God’s wrath will immediately convert a person to faith.

In Revelation 20, we read of the punishment of the evil trinity: Satan, the beast, and the false prophet. We

89

read: “And the devil, who deceived them, was thrown into the lake of burning sulfur, where the beast and the false prophet had been thrown. They will be tormented day and night for ever and ever.” (v. 10). Two verses later we read about the fate of all human beings outside of Christ: “And I saw the dead, great and small, standing before the throne, and books were opened. Another book was opened, which is the book of life. The dead were judged according to what they had done as recorded in the books. 13 The sea gave up the dead that were in it, and death and Hades gave up the dead that were in them, and each person was judged according to what they had done. 14 Then death and Hades were thrown into the lake of fire. The lake of fire is the second death. 15 Anyone whose name was not found written in the book of life was thrown into the lake of fire.” (vv. 12-15).

There is no way that anyone could read such verses and conclude that the lost are still objects of God’s love. They are, instead, objects of His eternal wrath.

A Shocking Resurrection

But the idea of God’s righteous hatred of the wicked is not just taught in the last book of the Bible. We read in Daniel 12:2 an amazing end-times’ statement: “Multitudes who sleep in the dust of the earth will awake: some to everlasting life, others to shame and everlasting contempt.”

The Bible teaches that there will be a resurrection of the wicked, for they will receive indestructible bodies which will undergo God’s wrath eternally. We do not rejoice in such a doctrine, but must recognize that, apart from God’s grace in our lives, we would merit the same. And that’s one major reason why those of us who are saved must get the Good New about Jesus out to a lost world. A.W. Tozer said, “The vague and tenuous

90

hope that God is too kind to punish the ungodly has become a deadly opiate for the consciences of millions.”11 May those of us who by His grace know Him not succumb to such a doctrinal drug.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on November 28, 2021 in saved

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Ruminating on ROMANS! (Some Thoughts on Paul’s Great Epistle) #34 “Critical Imperatives for the Christ-Follower” (A Study of Romans 12) Part 6

Many of you know that my New Jersey friend Frank and I are reading through God’s Word together (described here). We’re now in the book of Romans and are reading chapter 12 each day this week.I count 24 injunctions or commands or imperatives for the believer here in Romans 12. I’m aware that the expression “critical imperative” is redundant, but I think it’s useful for what we see here in this great chapter. Let’s continue our multipart study by looking at verse 9.

We’ve seen that the believer is to offer his body as a living sacrifice, not to conform to the pattern of this world, to be transformed by the renewing of his mind, to think of himself with sober judgment, and to use his gifts to build up the body of Christ.

The sixth critical imperative is —6. The believer is to HATE! (v. 9)

The topic of HATRED is seldom studied in the Scriptures. God hates. And godly people are to hate. Really! Here is the biblical evidence:

VERSES OF GOD HATING:

Psalm 5:5 The arrogant cannot stand in your presence. You hate all who do wrong;
Psalm 11:5 The Lord examines the righteous, but the wicked, those who love violence, he hates with a passion.
Proverbs 6:16 There are six things the Lord hates, seven that are detestable to him:
Isaiah 1:14 Your New Moon feasts and your appointed festivals I hate with all my being. They have become a burden to me; I am weary of bearing them.
Hosea 9:15 “Because of all their wickedness in Gilgal, I hated them there. Because of their sinful deeds, I will drive them out of my house. I will no longer love them; all their leaders are rebellious.
Amos 5:21 “I hate, I despise your religious festivals; your assemblies are a stench to me.
Zechariah 8:17 “do not plot evil against each other, and do not love to swear falsely. I hate all this,” declares the Lord.
Malachi 1:3 2 “I have loved you,” says the Lord. “But you ask, ‘How have you loved us?’
“Was not Esau Jacob’s brother?” declares the Lord. “Yet I have loved Jacob, 3 but Esau I have hated, and I have turned his hill country into a wasteland and left his inheritance to the desert jackals.”

VERSES OF OUR HATING:

Ecclesiastes 3:8 a time to love and a time to hate, a time for war and a time for peace.
Psalm 31:6 I hate those who cling to worthless idols; as for me, I trust in the Lord.
Psalm 45:7 You love righteousness and hate wickedness; therefore God, your God, has set you above your companions by anointing you with the oil of joy.
Psalm 97:10 Let those who love the Lord hate evil, for he guards the lives of his faithful ones and delivers them from the hand of the wicked.
Psalm 119:113 I hate double-minded people, but I love your law.
Psalm 139:21 Do I not hate those who hate you, Lord, and abhor those who are in rebellion against you?
Proverbs 8:13 To fear the Lord is to hate evil; I hate pride and arrogance, evil behavior and perverse speech.
Amos 5:15 Hate evil, love good; maintain justice in the courts.
Luke 14:26 “If anyone comes to me and does not hate father and mother, wife and children, brothers and sisters—yes, even their own life—such a person cannot be my disciple.
John 12:25 Anyone who loves their life will lose it, while anyone who hates their life in this world will keep it for eternal life.
Romans 7:15 I do not understand what I do. For what I want to do I do not do, but what I hate I do.
Romans 12:9 Love must be sincere. Hate what is evil; cling to what is good.
Revelation 2:6 But you have this in your favor: You hate the practices of the Nicolaitans, which I also hate.

A SUMMARY OF THIS ISSUE OF HATE!

We must recognize that just as there is godly pride and godly jealousy, there is also a kind of godly hatred! The Bible teaches that God hates those who do wrong; He hates “with a passion” those who love violence. Seven sins are hated by the Lord (and the seventh He really detests). God hates “with all [His] being” Israel’s empty New Moon feasts and appointed festivals.

God says of His people Israel in Hosea, “Because of all their wickedness in Gilgal, I hated them there.” Again He shows His contempt for His people’s religious emptiness when He says, “I hate, I despise your religious festivals; your assemblies are a stench to me.” God hates the sin of those who plot evil against another and who love to swear falsely. We learn in Malachi of the Lord saying, “I have loved Jacob, but Esau I have hated.”

It’s one thing for God to hate, but are we too as well? Yes! There is “a time to hate,” says Ecclesiastes. The Psalmist says he hates those who cling to worthless idols, that those who love the Lord should hate evil. He says he hates double-minded people and declares, “Do I not hate those who hate you, Lord, and abhor those who are in rebellion against you?” In fact, the very definition of fearing the Lord, according to Proverbs is “to hate evil.” Amos tells us that we are to “hate evil, love good.”

Amazingly, in Luke Jesus says that one must hate his family . . . or he cannot be Christ’s disciple. He actually tells us to hate our own life so that we will gain eternal life. The Apostle Paul looks at his life and says that he doesn’t do what he should and hates what he does do! Believers are commanded in Romans 12 to “hate what is evil; cling to what is good” (very similar to Amos’ statement).

Obviously in some of these passages the Lord Jesus is using hyperbole, an exaggeration for effect. But figures of speech (like hyperbole) are used when “normal” language doesn’t suffice. Feeling intense animosity against those things that God hates is one aspect of the Christian life that we have missed. Perhaps we have overemphasized our understanding of His “love” to our own detriment.

Today’s Challenge: What should you actively HATE today? Why? And how will you express that godly hatred?

 

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 15, 2021 in Romans 12

 

Tags: , , , ,

The Theology of Calvin . . . and Hobbes (Enmity Sells!)

I’m not sure it could be said any better about our present political climate! When debates are embarrassing to the entire country, when political opponents can’t say anything nice or kind about the other person, when we are fed a steady diet of misinformation and ad hominems, we are smack in the middle of an “enmity sells” environment. That’s why we Jesus-followers are commanded to pray for our leaders!

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on October 20, 2020 in Calvin & Hobbes

 

Tags: , , , ,

Dealing with DOUBT . . . and DOUBTERS! (A Study of Jude 22-23)

I. Show them mercy!

We don’t always treat doubters with kindness. We seem to resent their questions and can become angry at their unbelief. Os Guinness wrote a great book a few years ago entitled Doubt. It has been re-issued as In Two Minds. He’s also written an excellent article entitled “I Believe in Doubt” which may be found here.

We must give room for seekers to express their doubts and ask their questions. And that calls for MERCY!

II. Don’t lose the urgency of the gospel — “snatching them from the fire”

How close is your unsaved friend to eternity? One breath. One heartbeat. It’s not surprising that we Jesus-followers are sometimes over-zealous in presenting the gospel. Eternity is at stake! If I truly believe the gospel, sometimes I will feel compelled by the Holy Spirit to speak about eternal lostness. And so should you.

III. Have a godly fear yourself!

“mixed with fear”  — of what? Perhaps that doubt might begin to erode your own confidence in God. We are to show mercy mixed with fear. If this is a reference to the fear of the evangelist, then it might be a holy terror of what will happen to those who reject God’s mercy.

[I’m reminded of Galatians 6:1 which says, “Brothers and sisters, if someone is caught in a sin, you who live by the Spirit should restore that person gently. But watch yourselves, or you also may be tempted.” There is risk involved in ministry . . . and in evangelism.]

IV. Don’t lose your hatred of sin!

‘“hating even their clothing stained by corrupted flesh”! What an expression! There is such a thing as godly hatred. And here that godly hatred is expressed hyperbolically as directed at the lost person’s clothing! That’s how much we should HATE SIN!

Today’s Challenge: Do you really care about lost people? Do their questions irritate you — or cause you to respond in mercy and love? Does their continual refusal to believe the gospel discourage you (me, too!)? May God renew you and me in a passion for the gospel, a love for the lost, and a clarity about the truth!

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on August 25, 2020 in Jude

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Back to the Basics: Theology Proper #11 God’s HOLY HATRED!

“You Christians have simply made God in your image!  You’ve created a deity you are comfortable with!” Really?  My unsaved friends have sometimes expressed such an opinion.  If their charge were correct, my God would be a lot easier to live with!

But the Bible presents the true God as holy, judgmental, and, at times, hateful! Really.  Let’s think for a few minutes about the HATRED of God. (The following is from my book When Temptation Strikes):

In a culture whose mantra is “God is love (if there is a God),” God condemns the Canaanites by saying to His people in Deuteronomy 12:31, “You must not worship the LORD your God in their way, because in worshiping their gods, they do all kinds of detestable things the LORD hates. They even burn their sons and daughters in the fire as sacrifices to their gods.” The God of the Bible is not into respecting religious pluralism, is He?

Really?

The Psalmist says in Psalm 5:5, “The arrogant cannot stand in your presence; you hate all who do wrong.” This seems a bit difficult to reconcile with Christians often saying that God hates the sin but loves the sinner. Similarly we read in Psalm 11:5, “The LORD examines the righteous, but the wicked and those who love violence his soul hates.”

In fact, one passage even tells us that the Lord turns from loving to hating those who commit sin: “Because of all their wickedness in Gilgal, I hated them there. Because of their sinful deeds, I will drive them out of my house. I will no longer love them; all their leaders are rebellious.” (Hosea 9:15).

We learn from Scripture that God despises empty religion, rituals that have lost their meaning. The Lord says to Isaiah, “Your New Moon festivals and your appointed feasts my soul hates. They have become a burden to me; I am weary of bearing them.” (Isaiah 1:14). The Lord’s burdened, exhausted soul is fed up with their empty festivities. The prophet Amos records the Lord’s words: “”I hate, I despise your religious feasts; I cannot stand your assemblies.” (Amos 5:21). When we just go through the religious motions, leaving our hearts at home, I wonder what the Lord feels about our meetings?

(This one’s clever.)

Several specific sins are listed by God as those He abhors. Isaiah 61:8 tells us, “For I, the LORD, love justice; I hate robbery and iniquity.” The Lord speaks of certain practices as “detestable things” that He “hates,” such as not turning from wickedness or not ceasing to worship other gods (Jeremiah 44:4). Proverbs 6:16-19 tells us that “There are six things the LORD hates, seven that are detestable to him . . .” The six things listed are “haughty eyes, a lying tongue, hands that shed innocent blood, a heart that devises wicked schemes, feet that are quick to rush into evil, a false witness who pours out lies and . . .” [I’m going to leave the seventh for you to look up. The Hebraic wording indicates that the seventh is something that God absolutely despises]. Zechariah records the Lord saying, “‘. . . do not plot evil against your neighbor, and do not love to swear falsely. I hate all this,’ declares the LORD.” (Zechariah 8:17).

In our divorce-addicted and violence-obsessed culture, God declares, “‘I hate divorce . . . and I hate a man’s covering himself with violence as well as with his garment,’ says the LORD Almighty. So guard yourself in your spirit, and do not break faith.” (Malachi 2:16). God has a hate list and it includes such sins as robbery, iniquity, plotting evil against one’s neighbor, loving to swear falsely, divorce, addiction to violence, breaking faith, etc .

(Do you agree?)

Not only does God hate wickedness (Psalm 45:7), but the Psalmist says that God’s followers are to do the same: “Let those who love the LORD hate evil, for he guards the lives of his faithful ones and delivers them from the hand of the wicked.” (Psalm 97:10). The Psalmist follows his own advice, for he says in Psalm 119:163, “I hate and abhor falsehood but I love your law.” In fact, the very definition of fearing the Lord, says Proverbs 8:13, is “to hate evil.”

There is “a time to love and a time to hate,” Solomon reminds us in Ecclesiastes 3:8. Amos 5:15 tells the believer to “Hate evil, love good; maintain justice in the courts. Perhaps the LORD God Almighty will have mercy on the remnant of Joseph.” And it is not just the Old Testament that contains such hate speech. Paul tells us that “Love must be sincere. Hate what is evil; cling to what is good.” (Romans 12:9). John compliments the church in Ephesus by saying, “But you have this in your favor: You hate the practices of the Nicolaitans, which I also hate.” (Revelation 2:6). Believers are to hate their own actions which are inconsistent with God’s Word. Paul confesses in Romans 7:15, “I do not understand what I do. For what I want to do I do not do, but what I hate I do.”

The mayor of New York City Michael Bloomberg once said, “I never liked anyone who didn’t have a temper. If you don’t have any temper, you don’t have any passion.” While there are differences between anger and hatred, we must realize that there is a holy hatred that we must have. Hating what God hates shows a passion for Him and His truth. I realize this could sound crazy, especially in a culture that expects Christians to show only love, but could it be that we have not learned how to hate?!

Some have suggested that the God of the Old Testament was a God of anger, fury, and wrath, but that the God of the New Testament is a God of mercy, love, and forgiveness. This old liberal saw does not survive serious examination, especially in light of Jesus’ declarations about hell in the Gospels and the book of Revelation’s descriptions of the Lake of Fire. We learn in Daniel 12:2 that “Multitudes who sleep in the dust of the earth will awake: some to everlasting life, others to shame and everlasting contempt.” Those who die outside of the saving work of Christ will be in the end not eternal objects of God’s love, but of His wrath and of His holy hatred.

What response to sin would we want God to have? Some think He is actively torturing His creation, that He is a cosmic sadist who entertains Himself with human misery. Others believe that He combines both the good and bad in Himself, the Yin and the Yang, that there is a dark side to God. Still others suggest that God is impassive, that He doesn’t care one way or the other what happens in His universe, that He is really “beyond all that.” But as Sam Mikolaski says, “Unless God is angry with sin, let us put a bullet in our collective brain, for the universe is mad.”  (your thoughts?)

 

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 19, 2018 in doctrine of God

 

Tags: , ,

What Did Jesus Pray About? (Part 13)

What if it were possible for you and me to listen in on the Second Person of the Trinity’s prayer to His Father?  That’s exactly what we get to do with John 17.  Jesus doesn’t really pray for Himself.  He prays for US.  And much of His prayer for us concerns our place in the WORLD!  He uses the term “cosmos” 17 times in John 17 (I’ve marked each of them).  Let’s look at numbers 7 through 9 this morning (in verse 14).

After Jesus said this, he looked toward heaven and prayed:

“Father, the hour has come. Glorify your Son, that your Son may glorify you. 2 For you granted him authority over all people that he might give eternal life to all those you have given him. 3 Now this is eternal life: that they know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom you have sent. 4 I have brought you glory on earth by finishing the work you gave me to do. 5 And now, Father, glorify me in your presence with the glory I had with you before 1the world began.

Jesus Prays for His Disciples

6 “I have revealed you to those whom you gave me out of 2the world. They were yours; you gave them to me and they have obeyed your word. 7 Now they know that everything you have given me comes from you. 8 For I gave them the words you gave me and they accepted them. They knew with certainty that I came from you, and they believed that you sent me. 9 I pray for them. I am not praying for 3the world, but for those you have given me, for they are yours. 10 All I have is yours, and all you have is mine. And glory has come to me through them. 11 I will remain in 4the world no longer, but they are still in 5the world, and I am coming to you. Holy Father, protect them by the power of your name, the name you gave me, so that they may be one as we are one. 12 While I was with them, I protected them and kept them safe by that name you gave me. None has been lost except the one doomed to destruction so that Scripture would be fulfilled.

13 “I am coming to you now, but I say these things while I am still in 6the world, so that they may have the full measure of my joy within them. 14 I have given them your word and 7the world has hated them, for they are not of 8the world any more than I am of 9the world. 15 My prayer is not that you take them out of 10the world but that you protect them from the evil one. 16 They are not of 11the world, even as I am not of it. 17 Sanctify them by the truth; your word is truth. 18 As you sent me into 12the world, I have sent them into 13the world. 19 For them I sanctify myself, that they too may be truly sanctified.

Jesus Prays for All Believers

20 “My prayer is not for them alone. I pray also for those who will believe in me through their message, 21 that all of them may be one, Father, just as you are in me and I am in you. May they also be in us so that 14the world may believe that you have sent me. 22 I have given them the glory that you gave me, that they may be one as we are one— 23 I in them and you in me—so that they may be brought to complete unity. Then 15the world will know that you sent me and have loved them even as you have loved me.

24 “Father, I want those you have given me to be with me where I am, and to see my glory, the glory you have given me because you loved me before the creation of 16the world.

25 “Righteous Father, though 17the world does not know you, I know you, and they know that you have sent me. 26 I have made you known to them, and will continue to make you known in order that the love you have for me may be in them and that I myself may be in them.”

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on October 28, 2017 in the world

 

Tags: , , ,

What Did Jesus Pray About? (Part 12)

In asking the question, “What in the world is the Jesus-follower?”, we have been looking at Jesus’ high priestly prayer in John 17 and His seventeen uses of the word “world.” And, at the moment, we are noticing what He means by the word “world” in His prayer! Let’s continue asking what He means by that word in our seventh occurrence of it. We read in John 17 —

After Jesus said this, he looked toward heaven and prayed:

“Father, the hour has come. Glorify your Son, that your Son may glorify you. 2 For you granted him authority over all people that he might give eternal life to all those you have given him. 3 Now this is eternal life: that they know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom you have sent. 4 I have brought you glory on earth by finishing the work you gave me to do. 5 And now, Father, glorify me in your presence with the glory I had with you before the world began.

Jesus Prays for His Disciples

6 “I have revealed you to those whom you gave me out of the world. They were yours; you gave them to me and they have obeyed your word. 7 Now they know that everything you have given me comes from you. 8 For I gave them the words you gave me and they accepted them. They knew with certainty that I came from you, and they believed that you sent me. 9 I pray for them. I am not praying for the world, but for those you have given me, for they are yours. 10 All I have is yours, and all you have is mine. And glory has come to me through them. 11 I will remain in the world no longer, but they are still in the world, and I am coming to you. Holy Father, protect them by the power of your name, the name you gave me, so that they may be one as we are one. 12 While I was with them, I protected them and kept them safe by that name you gave me. None has been lost except the one doomed to destruction so that Scripture would be fulfilled.

13 “I am coming to you now, but I say these things while I am still in the world, so that they may have the full measure of my joy within them. 14 I have given them your word and the world has hated them, for they are not of the world any more than I am of the world. 15 My prayer is not that you take them out of the world but that you protect them from the evil one. 16 They are not of the world, even as I am not of it. 17 Sanctify them by the truth; your word is truth. 18 As you sent me into the world, I have sent them into the world. 19 For them I sanctify myself, that they too may be truly sanctified.

Jesus Prays for All Believers

20 “My prayer is not for them alone. I pray also for those who will believe in me through their message, 21 that all of them may be one, Father, just as you are in me and I am in you. May they also be in us so that the world may believe that you have sent me. 22 I have given them the glory that you gave me, that they may be one as we are one— 23 I in them and you in me—so that they may be brought to complete unity. Then the world will know that you sent me and have loved them even as you have loved me.

24 “Father, I want those you have given me to be with me where I am, and to see my glory, the glory you have given me because you loved me before the creation of the world.

25 “Righteous Father, though the world does not know you, I know you, and they know that you have sent me. 26 I have made you known to them, and will continue to make you known in order that the love you have for me may be in them and that I myself may be in them.”

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on October 27, 2017 in the world

 

Tags: , , , ,